Tony Tinworth

We asked Tony why he was a Whai Rawa saver and he replied "Whai Rawa seemed like too good an opportunity to pass up. I had just started a State Sector Retirement saving scheme, as had my wife. We had just purchased our first home and had no other savings. I have an AP on the first of each month for myself and the tamariki. I’m not really saving for anything, but there will be some bills at some stage in the future, when we have less income and it will be helpful".

At the Whai Rawa office we recently ran a survey asking for feedback on member’s investment knowledge. The survey generated some great responses and feedback. We did manage to get some funding from the boss which meant that 5 lucky survey respondents received $100 for their (Whai Rawa accounts and for their) troubles.

The third random name that came out was young ‘Tony Tinworth (Moeraki) who is from Taupō. Instead of taking the $100, Tony asked that we apply $50 into two child member’s accounts who didn’t get Matched Savings last year.

Ka pai Tony, you are officially our first Whai Rawa Good Sort! Two tamariki were selected at random and have had contact from us to clarify how $50 made its way into their respective accounts.

We asked Tony why he was a Whai Rawa saver and he replied “Whai Rawa seemed like too good an opportunity to pass up. I had just started a State Sector Retirement saving scheme, as had my wife. We had just purchased our first home and had no other savings. I have an AP on the first of each month for myself and the tamariki. I’m not really saving for anything, but there will be some bills at some stage in the future, when we have less income and it will be helpful”. He also said “the tamariki may decide to use their money to purchase their first home, study, or just keep it going to give them options later. We discuss the statements when they arrive. They have an idea of what that amount of money will purchase, but know it is for later. They will take over their accounts when they leave home” although officially they become adult members of Whai Rawa on their 16th birthdays.

He is ‘pretty happy’ with what he’s saved so far. “We are in for the long term and would suggest maybe there could be a high-growth option for those people. A bit higher risk with a bit higher return”.